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Oct 29, 2013
The Pressures of Indie Development
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Greetings Indie RPGamers, and welcome to the newest issue of Indie Corner. Our topic this time around is twofold, as we discuss issues with getting noticed and running Kickstarters along with talk about other pressures in indie development. We have two new faces joining the discussion this time around, so please welcome Phillip Hunt and Lars Doucet to the mix. For now, dig in and read.

Name: Craig Stern
Studio: Sinister Design
RPG Project(s): Telepath Tactics (PC)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

As I continue to become better-known and respected in the game development world, I've increasingly noticed that being a game developer is a little bit like being a character in an RPG. With each game I release, I get better at making and marketing my games, and I gain new tools for making more impressive titles more efficiently. I also attract more fans, who in turn make it easier to get the word out and publicize games going forward. With each release, I build my list of reporters to email, and enlarge the number of press outlets familiar with my work. Success builds on success, and there is no shortcut (absent incredible luck) for creating those first few games, building a fan base, and building familiarity.

(Just to put all of that in perspective: I began making video games in 2006. Telepath Tactics is my eighth game. This process takes time!)

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

Kickstarter is pretty great; it makes the creation of big, polished games much more attainable for indie developers. But it's not exempt from the "RPG character" effect I mentioned above. My success with Telepath Tactics was the result of years of making games, accruing fans, and building contacts with the press and other developers (who were, in turn, crucial in helping me drive traffic to the project's page). And even then, I still had to do a bit of "grinding," carrying over my initial backers into a second campaign. My experiences with that were covered by Mac Life in some detail here.

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

For me, it mostly just validates my "Being a Developer is Like Being an RPG Character" metaphor. The guys that made Project Phoenix were high-level characters, so they were able to make it through that particular battle by just mashing the X button. We lower-level developers have to try harder, and we still won't get results like that. We simply don't have the stats yet.

Beyond that, though, it really doesn't impact me. I've learned not to waste time being angry at people who experience "easy success" as developers. For one thing, it's rarely anywhere near as easy as it looks from the outside--but more than that, thinking that way is a waste of time and energy. It's not like my success is contingent on other people failing. Just the opposite, in fact! If I've learned anything from the last year or so, it's that the best tack to take is one of cooperation and mutual support.

You can think of it as the indie development scene's own personal little prisoner's dilemma: the more we cooperate, the healthier we all end up. I do better when inXile and Obsidian and Larian Studios help bring peoples' attention to the indie space as a viable place to get the types of RPGs that were thought to have died out back in the mid-90s. I do better when I support these guys instead of griping publicly, because then I can ask them to turn around and support me. (Which they did, by the way!) We don't have the marketing power to make this sort of thing work without working together; there's just no room for pettiness in the indie scene. My advice to other developers is to swallow your jealousy and learn to celebrate other developers' successes.

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

I know I've had my own troubles coping with the overwhelming negativity of much of the internet, but I've succeeded in building up a much thicker skin over the past few years. It helps to be able to look at your work as an imperfect thing. It helps to take criticism as an indication--sometimes misdirected, but nonetheless valuable--of things you can do to make it better. That may sound obvious, but it can be very difficult to distance yourself from your work in that way when you're first starting out. It helps to regard it as an intellectual exercise: take a step back and say, "What is this person trying to communicate about the game? What could I change to avoid this reaction in the future?"

In the case of Phil Fish (to whom I assume you're referring), it's a little different. The vast majority of what he was dealing with weren't criticisms of his game at all, but blatant personal attacks. Could he have handled it better? Sure. Frankly, though, I can't say I would have handled it all that well myself had I been in that position. Targeted campaigns of internet harassment are not in the developer job description; I don't blame him even a bit for flipping out over it, even if that did ultimately prove counterproductive.

Links: Sinister Design Official Site

Name: Phillip Hunt
Studio: Hunt Game Studios
RPG Project(s): Gheldia (PC, Vita, Xbox 360)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

Getting noticed by the press reminds me of the classic job dilemma. You can't apply for a job without experience, but you can't build experience without having a job. The same applies to getting coverage on the larger gaming sites it seems. Since Gheldia is my first official game, I'm still at the bottom of the ladder fighting my way up for coverage.

However, there have been a few indie and RPG sites that have worked with us to put some features together which has been very cool. It's all about building relationships with editors and finding those people that share your interests. The gaming landscape is getting very busy (especially this year), so fighting for attention has become increasingly challenging.

We had the added benefit of exhibiting at PAX Prime the last two years which has helped us out tremendously. The feedback from gamers is always great, and at this year's show we even got some small media attention as well. We're going to launch a beta demo soon which should help get more people interested. Building a following requires time and effort, and I plan to invest more in this area leading up to release.

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

Crowd funding is definitely an interesting beast. I've haven't created a campaign yet and have only recently become a backer. I'm still waiting to see where it goes before fully committing to the idea. Right now I view crowdfunding as a double-edged sword as it has the potential to be a great community building tool, but also carries tremendous risk.

For instance, the game's vision can be compromised and pulled in many different directions as developers try to gain backers through the promise of features. The budget can be drained by including physical rewards at lower tiers which then strains the remaining funds for the actual development. Then there are stretch goals that can cause the entire project to slip due to scoping issues and more.

On the flip side, your game will already have an audience when it launches which is never a bad thing. These gamers will make up your community and will champion your game when it comes out. They will help you along the way to potentially make it an even better experience by giving their feedback through closed betas and voting polls. There's definitely potential there as long as it's guided.

It'll be interesting to see where it all goes, but I'm not 100% sold on it just yet.

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

Running a successful campaign is only part of the entire process. I think having a successful campaign can potentially distort player expectations and put unnecessary pressure on the final product (especially when stretch goals are involved). Games are especially prone to feature creep and can easily go over budget as too many ideas are implemented. I've had to delay Gheldia several times due to reworking the game's vision, and that's without the added pressure of having backers. It can't be easy when the public's money is already invested in the product.

I want these projects to succeed, as I feel people should create games they're passionate about. These projects could also open the doors for smaller studios to see some success which then benefits us all. However, if I ever decide to go this route I'm going to ensure that the game's vision is clear and do plenty of planning upfront before starting development (more investment in tool creation!).

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

Whenever you publish something to the public you're bound to get comments from both sides of the fence. On various websites, including our Greenlight page, we've received our fair share of negative comments and criticism. At times there is some truth to these comments, but you need to be able to wade through what's actually relevant. Getting different opinions on your project is good as long as they're constructive and not personal attacks.

At the end of the day you need to remind yourself what attracted you to video games and developing them in the first place. You're not going to please every gamer out there so you should focus on making the best game you can for those who will enjoy it. We met a number of people at PAX who were just as excited as us about Gheldia and spent time chatting with us and playing the game. There were others who weren't interested and quickly moved on. It's a much better use of your time to focus on those who love what you do.

Links: Hunt Game Studios Official Site

Name: Ryan Vandendyck
Studio: Eden Industries
RPG Project(s): Citizens of Earth (PC)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

To be honest I think this is hardest thing I face in making games. After my work in the mainstream industry, the critical success of Waveform, and the phenomenal hands-on impressions we've received for Citizens of Earth, I'm reasonably confident I know how to make a good quality game. But it's always a struggle for me in making a game that's noticed. One success I've had is accosting anyone at GDC with a press badge. I went on a live show at Gamespot via this tactic, and two years in a row got to speak with one of the founders of IGN which was pretty fun. Certainly the big challenge is just getting noticed long enough to start building relationships with press and gamers. So far this has been a slow, uphill battle, but I think I'm making progress. Another challenge, especially with Waveform, was trying to put together marketing and promotional material on my own. At the time of release I didn't really have an artist, so everything was cobbled together by me. And I think that was pretty stupid on my part, since likely with a more compelling set of images people would've taken notice a lot more readily.

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

Kickstarter is great in the financial freedom it grants creators to make awesome games. But personally I have to say, I definitely don't have a good grasp on it! This may go back to the first point about the challenge of being noticed, but somehow Kickstarter and I just don't get along. I did a Kickstarter for my first game, Waveform, that was not successful. Despite that, I went on to finish the game and it was received very well critically (81 on Metacritic), which makes me think I must've done a good job with the game, but a bad job with the Kickstarter. Currently I'm doing a Kickstarter for my upcoming game Citizens of Earth, and likely by the time this Indie Corner is published it will also be unsuccessful given the dismal progress it's currently making. Again, this is despite the fact that the press we've been receiving for the game has been overwhelmingly positive. So again, I think I've done a good job making the game, but a bad job making the Kickstarter (or at the very least, getting the Kickstarter noticed). Whether my lack of success can be attributed to making very unattractive Kickstarter projects, bad timing, lack of exposure, or having a playable game both times (in contrast to most projects which are created in the very early stages of development), I'm not sure. But while I think Kickstarter is a good idea, I may have to resign myself to the fact that for whatever reason, it's a bad match for me.

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

Back when I was working in the mainstream industry, it was always a bit of a running joke about how best to create wild, hype-filled pitches to publishers to get them to buy into the proposal without having anything substantial. You wouldn't believe the multi-million dollar deals struck with far less of a vision than Project Phoenix had! In terms of what I learned professionally from the Project Phoenix Kickstarter, perhaps it was that people like hype as much as publishers do when it comes to funding projects.

I think this reality in the mainstream industry caused me to want to go in the opposite direction and do things in a much more concrete fashion, which is why on our own Kickstarter we had a playable demo and tons of practical content to show off. Now obviously their result and mine is about as opposite as you can get. I'm sure their high-profile reputation is a factor, but I do wonder about the effect of hype and playing into a person's imagination as opposed to showing your hand, so to speak. So that'll be something that will inform future professional decisions definitely. But certainly at the end of the day, the fact that they demonstrated that it is possible to generate a lot of funding and interest in an RPG project by an indie developer is great.

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

During the development of my last game, Waveform, it felt like the hits just kept on coming! I was developing that game in the evening and weekends while working in a mainstream studio on Luigi's Mansion Dark Moon, meaning I worked 40-50 hours a week making games at my full-time job, then came home to work another 30-40 hours on Waveform. Working 80 hour weeks for three years was insanely exhausting, and there were many times I wanted to quit one or both just from the mental and physical exertion alone. In the midst of this, my mom passed away suddenly. As she was a major influence in my dream to make games, this hit extremely hard. And to top it off, I got married during all that. And of course the marriage was a good thing! But it represented a pretty major lifestyle upheaval.

So I was negotiating 80 hours a week of work for three years, grieving the sudden passing of my mom, spending all of my life savings on the dream of this game, and all the while trying to find time for my wife so she didn't divorce me. My advice for anyone struggling with a similar situation is, you have to want it. Bad. More than anything. That may be cliché or not practically helpful, but I think it's true. At least, it was for me. Deep down it's what I wanted to do more than anything since I was a little kid, so I knew that I just had to persevere no matter what.

Finally, somehow, I managed to release the game on Steam to pretty good critical acclaim. About a day or two after the release though, I was slammed across the internet as high-profile indies mounted their soapbox to erroneously condemn me for ripping off a Flash game. I ended up writing an article on Gamasutra about that, in case you want more detail. Suffice to say though, as hard as the development of the game was, it was equally devastating to be ripped to shreds post-release by the indie community that I thought would embrace a fellow developer, or at least do their research into the facts. As for advice on how to handle something like that, I don't know. I'm still trying to figure that all out in many ways. I personally don't think I could pull a Phil Fish, but I guess I can't blame him for it. I try to adopt a stance of "kill 'em with kindness" whenever I'm attacked like that. Hard to say if it's effective, but I sleep a bit better knowing at least that I didn't make any additional enemies.

And then of course as others have mentioned there are always vicious comments about the games themselves. Generally, I try to read between the lines for useful criticism, but try to overlook the negative tones and phrasing. Of course not everyone is going to love your game, and while it'd sure be nice if folks recognized that not every game was tailor-made for their interests and let it pass by without heaping on the hate first, that'll probably never happen. So you just have to take the good with the bad, and remember that a lot of people do love your game! Take solace in that, and see if there are any legitimate concerns voiced in the criticisms that you can use to make the game better.

Links: Eden Industries Official Site

Name: Lars Doucet
Studio: Level Up Labs
RPG Project(s): Defender's Quest II: Mists of Ruin (PC)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

I've noticed that attention from press doesn't directly correlate to sales, for one. Here's an interesting case study:

Defender's Quest is financially quite successful, is critically acclaimed (4.5 from RPGamer), but doesn't have enough reviews to even qualify for a Metacritic score. Meanwhile, my unfinished, kinda crappy prototype TouretteQuest has broken through to major mainstream media outlets like NBCNews, The Huffington Post, and even The Wall Street Journal, despite being years away from being finished and not even very fun to play. I like to joke sometimes that TouretteQuest is probably more notable by Wikipedia standards than Defender's Quest, even though the latter has sold over 80,000 copies. The really funny part is despite the media attention, I have no idea how popular TouretteQuest would actually be with players -- it could be a complete flop.

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

Kickstarter is fine, but I don't like how it forces you to conform to a certain kind of pitch, and expectations are set by everybody else who has used the site. You have to do a talking-heads video, and you have to cram your rewards into awkward little text boxes, and it's hard to explain how cumulative tiers work if they ever break from the "...and everything you see above" model. The fact that people have to resort to confusing flow-charts and grids to explain their reward tiers suggests to me there's room for improvement in the design layout.

That's why I plan on doing our own pre-order campaign for Defender's Quest 2 on our own site. I guess I'm just a control freak.

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

I have to recuse myself from commenting on this one :) The musician for Defender's Quest 1, Kevin Penkin, is actually working on Project Phoenix, and he'll be returning for Defender's Quest 2, along with his employer, Creative Intelligence Arts (the guys behind Project Phoenix). So although I'd normally love to weigh in here, it's probably best if I don't.

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

We frame these things in terms of "success" and "failure" too often. It's important to persevere in the face of adversity, but sometimes it's also the sanest, healthiest thing in the world to just quit. We all have limits, and if you've gotten to the point that your work is actually hurting you, why torture yourself? Also, we often value the art at the expense of the artist. For instance - The Empire Strikes Back likely precipitated George Lucas' divorce. Which is more important -- a marriage or a movie?

I love my work, but I don't worship it. If it ever comes between me and my family, or my physical and mental health, I'll give it up. Life's too short.

Links: Level Up Labs Official Site

Name: David Welch
Studio: Experimental Gamer
RPG Project(s): Boot Hill Heroes (PC, etc.)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

It's difficult because marketing takes time and energy that is better spent on making better games. I know people who have made terrific games go almost completely unnoticed because they were unable or unwilling to do the marketing legwork. There's also an emotional toll seeing your game passed over by the press in favor of another, but at the same time it's equally as rewarding to be acknowledged.

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

Overall it's great because it enables some people to make the games they otherwise could not. Although I'm a little concerned with how reception to Kickstarters is changing. My favorite Kickstarters are those by unknowns who want to introduce an unknown concept and genuinely need funding for a specific purpose to make that happen. It feels like we're moving away from that.

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

I've noticed that many game Kickstarters do well when they have some impressive screenshots or even just some impressive concept art. These things don't necessarily tell the entire story. I think we should take the time to dig a little deeper into a project than that or we're more likely to make some bad investments. I hope Project Phoenix doesn't disappoint.

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

Of course, indie developers make substantial personal and financial sacrifices. However, I don't really see them as sacrifices since I'm doing exactly what I want to be doing. Instead I try to be thankful for all the people (friends, family, press, Kickstarter backers) who gave me this opportunity, and I want to do the best I can not to disappoint them. So ultimately making a game isn't a struggle for me. Not making a game would be a struggle.

There's also the difficulty with dealing with criticism that I'm sure all indie developers must endure. We spend years creating a thing that is a reflection of us, so it's impossible not to be hurt if someone doesn't like it. I try to deal with this by instead focusing on how I can use any criticism, no matter how glib and thoughtless, as a constructive suggestion I can use. For example, even if a YouTube commenter just writes "sucks" in response to a trailer, then perhaps that tells me something about the way it is being presented that I can change. All feedback is useful, and I am thankful for it.

With that said, if I could have one wish regarding how people perceive games it would be for them not to presume to know everything there is to know about a game from just a screenshot. It's hard to represent the depth of an entire game, especially an RPG, in just a screenshot. I know this is difficult because we see so many screenshots of games ever day, and there isn't time to research all these titles. But perhaps at least withholding final judgment until the game can be reviewed is a good idea.

Links: Experimental Gamer Official Site

Name: Adam Rippon
Studio: Muteki Corp
RPG Project(s): Dragon Fantasy Book II (PS3, Vita)

1) Some of you have already released projects, others are working on your first right now. What challenges and successes have you had with getting noticed from press or gamers alike?

I've made a lot of friends in the press over the last couple years, and getting them to pay attention isn't too difficult anymore. However, getting people to notice you is only half the battle - I can't tell you how many people have been excited about the game and then just never had the time to write an actual article! Being a small indie RPG, it's very easy to get completely buried under bigger announcements. Dragon Fantasy Book II came out the same day as Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 and a week before Diablo III - WHOOPS.

2) Kickstarter has become a major part of the indie RPG scene of late, some of you having even successfully funded through the site. What are your thoughts on crowdfunding? Any personal experiences you'd like to share about it?

It's something I want to try someday, but I don't ever want to be solely reliant on it. DF1 and 2 were both totally self-funded, and I feel like if I'd asked for the actual budget of those games people would have FLIPPED. Every time I see someone do a Kickstarter for a complex RPG and they're asking for $25k, I assume they must have a profoundly rich uncle, or they've got no problem eating the insulation in their walls for sustenance, 'cause making RPGs is expensive!

3) In the last issue of Indie Corner, I expressed my concerns about Project Phoenix. Despite my apprehension, the project went on to fund with over a million dollars, despite lacking a clear vision for the game. How does seeing major indie projects like that succeed impact you on a personal and professional level?

I'm still not sure how I feel about big teams doing Kickstarters. Even I've got some ability to raise money the old fashioned way, and I feel like if you can raise money the like that it probably makes more sense to do it the old fashioned way.

4) Not long ago, one major indie developer succumbed to the pressure of the gaming world and cancelled his project in a blaze of glory. What are some personal issues you've had to overcome during your development and how did you deal with them? Any advice for those struggling?

Every time someone starts a review off with "I don't like JRPGs, but here's my review of ", a little part of me dies. Making a game can be an incredibly personal experience, and it hurts very, very badly to get a bad review (and they happen pretty frequently when indie games are reviewed by major publications that cater mostly to AAA games), or even just an annoyed customer who's yelling at your support email. I guess my only advice is to remember that somewhere else there is someone who loved your game. For every ten emails I get, nine are positive. But I always end up fixating on that last one.

Links: Muteki Corp Official Site

Featuring more than just Kickstarter this time, Indie Offerings hits up a few recently released titles as well.

  • Defender's Quest II: Mists of Ruin
    Though already touched on briefly above, Defender's Quest II: Mists of Ruin from Level Up Labs has been officially revealed. The company is ignoring the Kickstarter trend and doing its own crowdfunding campaign, which I have to say looks really interesting. This cuts to the chase of what Kickstarter has turned into for many: a glorified pre-order campaign. Level Up Labs is boldly offering pre-order packages with no funding goal to meet or stretch goals to have to reach. If you're interested in the game, simply back it for a copy on release.



  • Gheldia
    Another newcomer to the Indie Corner, Gheldia is an action adventure RPG with 16-bit stylings. There are many similarities to older Zelda titles, but with more RPG twists than those offer and a freely explorable world. If there is one thing I can really say stood out to me about the trailer, it's the music. I'm a sucker for a good soundtrack, and the piece that plays during the IGF trailer is lovely. Stay tuned for more on this one in the days to come.



  • Two Brothers
    In prior issues of Indie Corner, AckkStudios talked about the studio's upcoming RPG Two Brothers. RPGamer got some hands on time with the game not too long ago, which you can read about here. The game should be available before the end of October, so keep an eye out if you're interested.



  • Hyper Light Drifter
    One of the latest successful Kickstarter sensations is the stylish Hyper Light Drifter, a 2D action RPG that claims to blend elements from A Link to the Past and Diablo into a richly colored world. The game, being developed by Heart Machine, well exceeded its $27,000 goal when it closed on Oct. 12 with over $645,000 total. The project looks very interesting, but I fear the Port Monster has once again struck, as so often happens during Kickstarters. Hyper Light Drifter is now planned for release in 2014 on PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Vita, Wii U, and Ouya. Good luck with those ports.



  • Forced
    An indie RPG from BetaDwarf, Forced was successfully Kickstarted last December for PC, Mac, Linux, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and Ouya. The game is now available on three of those platforms, as it just released on Steam on Oct. 24. Forced is a one-to-four player co-op action RPG where players take on the role of a gladiator in a fight for life or death. The consoles versions are currently scheduled for release next summer.



  • Dungeon Dashers
    Taking advantage of Steam's Early Access program, Jigxor has released an early build of Dungeon Dashers on Steam. This game is a speedy, turn-based dungeon crawler that seeks to make loot gathering fast and fun. Jigxor is looking to add a four player co-op mode in the future to help add to the tabletop gaming with friends feel the game has going for it. Check it out now.



That's all for this time. Thank you once again for reading and please support our indie developers who were kind enough to take the time to share with us today. I hope you enjoy what they have to offer. Until next time!

- Michael A. Cunningham

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