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Googleshng - July 19 '04- 4:00 Eastern Standard Time

Today the first thing mentioned in this here rant is particularly messing with my mind. That link is a downer incidently. So anyway uh, on with the column I suppose...

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Endless parades of sequels.

Okay, I'm a big Nintendo fan, and I have to say that the Pokemon games are fun RPGs....

But holy triforce, how many are they planning to do? Will it be like Final Fantasy (I love the series, by the way), with the never ending games till doomsday comes?

I mean, really. Yeah, Ruby and Sapphire had *some* new tricks to it, but other than that, more than seven games of same old, same old?

But what is your opinion? Does it look worth it?

-Barrier

Googleshng:
I can only think of one series of games ever whose creators willingly decided to end it, and even then the publishers decided to just revive the license in another form. It's the nature of the industry to keep running when you have a good thing going (or even if you DON'T have a good thing going really).

As far as Pokémon goes specifically though, yeah, I've had enough of them personally.

 
Linearity non est.

Hey goog,

I was just thinking of a series with a different kind of world-exploration: the SaGa series.

In most of the games (Romancing SaGa and up), you could explore everywhere and anywhere, from nearly the beginning of the game, provided you could last that long. Monsters' levels were determined by the number of battles you'd fought, so if you ran away too often you'd be penalized with harder and harder battles.

And in the later Romancing SaGa games, locations on the worldmap wouldn't appear until someone had told you about them, so it was possible to put a lot of areas into one section of the map, and still make you do a bit of searching to find them. It also gave the impression that there was a lot more out there than you could see.

Of course, the later SaGa games deviated from this, but I wouldn't mind seeing a later installment in the series doing this kind of thing. It'd make for a nice change of pace, don't you think?

weekendrisktaker

Googleshng:
I can't really speak for the RS games, having never had a chance to play them, but SaGa Frontier, while a great example of a non-linear RPG, doesn't exactly provide a whole lot in the way of having a big open world to explore. I was talking more about the whole "Now I have a boat, so I can go to Elftown, or I can stop and check out these islands over here and find a spiffy new sword." "Now I have an airship, so I can head off to the Fire Temple, but first I can look around for all those places on the map surrounded by mountains I couldn't reach before and get new summons." etc. etc. Where have all the world maps gone?

 
Weird question this.

Google,

This question was inspired by Callahan's Place, oddly enough.

I was reading 'Callahan's Legacy' by Spider Robinson, and got to the part where Jake Stonebender is discussing (if you pardon the pun) a powerful subject with Nikola Tesla and Buck Rogers. Nikola mentions he once proposed to J.P. Morgan, "a rather grandiose project: [he] proposed to pump energy into the planet Earth, in essence turning it into a colossal storage battery, so that anywhere on its surface, one could sink a rod into the soil and draw power."

That got me thinking. Perhaps Squaresoft happens to like Spider Robinson (there's a passage in another of his books about reincarnation and the continuum of souls, which reminds me of Final Fantasy IX).

Also, speaking of FF7, would it be possible for your average Joe to secretly tap the planet for free mako energy (provided they have the right equipment and knowledge, and didn't care one way or another about destroying the planet) without tipping Shinra off to their scheme? Everyone was practically walking on a potenial energy source, and I suppose it would be no different than someone setting up their own solar panels on their roof or wind turbines or something. Except that solar and wind power doesn't endanger the planet, of course.

Perhaps I should quit thinking about video games while I'm reading.
-CW "I catnap when I'm tired, and catnip when I'm not!"

Googleshng:
One would assume it's like any other natural resource really. If you have the right equipment, yeah, just dig a hole somewhere and start pulling up and processing those magic rocks. I'd imagine the startup costs would be pretty prohibitive though, and Shinra probably has some strong-arm tactics they use to keep their monopoly. More like drilling for oil than setting up solar panels I'd say.




The Last Laugh:

Tomorrow's column should be significantly less late and spacey than today's. Again, see yon downer rant up there.

On a much lighter note, I finally had a chance to take a look at Planescape: Torment this weekend. Any game that starts off with you and a talking skull hitting on zombies gets a big thumbs up from me.



Googleshng "Who needs your journal? You've got a whole novel written on you here!" @rpgamer.com

Morte funny.

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